A weblog of The Living Church Foundation

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The Collect of the Week
A new Covenant
Covenant, founded in August 2007 as a weblog community of “evangelical and catholic” Christians, begins a new life today. Covenant has attracted about 40 editorial contributors, including bishops, cathedral deans, priests, and theologians. Covenant will expand its family of contributors in the months ahead.

This page will be an archive of content from August 2007 to January 2012. Please visit Covenant’s thoroughly redesigned home at covenant.livingchurch.org and join the conversation.
See liturgical notes.

Covenant, founded in August 2007 as a weblog community of “evangelical and catholic” Christians, begins a new life today. Covenant has attracted about 40 editorial contributors, including bishops, cathedral deans, priests, and theologians. Covenant will expand its family of contributors in the months ahead.

This page will be an archive of content from August 2007 to January 2012. Please visit Covenant’s thoroughly redesigned home at covenant.livingchurch.org and join the conversation.


A new Covenant
 
Our Comment Policy

In order to comment, you must first register here. Enter your actual name, first and last (no pseudonyms), and email, and a password will be sent to you. Once you receive the password, follow the link in the email, type in your username and password, and you will be taken to your profile. From there you can return and comment on any post.

At Covenant we embrace interpersonal verifiability as a criterion of authenticity. While we understand the appeal, and in some cases the perceived necessity, of anonymity, we do not see it as compatible with the peculiar nature of ecclesial discourse: in and after the Word incarnate.

To be an adult Christian is, in the Episcopal Church (as in most denominations), to have made a profession of faith, which amounts to a public confirmation to the gathered community that one accepts the faith of the Church. First, the candidate is presented by another member of the body, only to speak in turn for him or herself: “I do,” two times, and the congregation likewise in turn: “We will.” Then all together recite the Apostles’ Creed in a dialogue with the bishop, followed by more questions, answers, and prayers; till finally the bishop confirms the candidate, laying “hands upon each one” and saying: “Strengthen, O Lord, your servant N. with your heavenly grace.” Like God, therefore, who calls us by name (see Isa. 43:1), so too the bishop, as the apostolic icon of the community’s tangible, mutually recognizable, and therefore shared life.

In this perspective, it seems to us that an online community, if it is to have a place within Christian mission, will naturally follow the same rules of public identification outside the walls of our churches that we observe inside those walls to the end, as always, of deeper conversion to the love of God and one another, in whose name we dare to converse (incorporating debate, admonition, and encouragement).

These are the “fruit of the Spirit” after which we are called to strive: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control (Gal. 5:22). Disciplining our tongues to avoid rants, sarcasm, and all forms of caustic wit that aim to cut others down, pray that we may advance some steps together in Christian holiness, even on the virtual pages of a weblog.

You yourselves are our letter, written on our hearts, to be known and read by all (2 Cor. 3:2).
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